An Apple a Day

The Aluminum – Magnesium Link

Research have suggested that aluminum may be more likely to accumulate in the brains of persons whose diets are magnesium-deficient — which, unfortunately, includes 90% of Americans! Several studies have shown that animals fed diets low in magnesium accumulate high concentrations of aluminum in the Central Nervous System. One of magnesium’s many functions is to activate the enzyme tubulin involved in the maintenance of nerve tissue cells. It has been suggested that when there is not enough Magnesium in the body to plug into the appropriate receptor site on the tubulin enzyme, aluminum takes its place instead. This leads to the inactivation of tubulin and, consequently, inadequate nerve function. Malic acid can pull aluminum away from this enzyme, making a place for magnesium. This may be a protection against Alzheimer’s disease. Malic Acid is found abundantly in fruits such as apples. Malic Acid is also produced in the human body. It is a metabolite of the Krebs cycle the set of biochemical reactions used to produce 90% of all energy in the cells of the body. Malic Acid readily crosses the Blood-Brain-Barrier and has been shown to bind to aluminum. It functions in the body by drawing aluminum away from the tubulin enzyme, so that Magnesium can plug into the receptor sites instead.  Malic Acid’s unique ability to bind with aluminum means it can be flushed out of the body, preventing unwanted build-up.

High fiber diet – Fiber in the diet will bind with aluminum salts and carry them out with your next bowel movement. Apple pectin, for instance is an effective binding agent.  (Read more about this at the site below.)

http://www.angelfire.com/az/sthurston/alzheimers_and_aluminum_toxicity.html

 

Because a Magnesium-deficient diet may increase the amount of aluminum taken up and stored by the body, it is vitally important that we take in sufficient amounts.

Bridget Coila has been writing professionally since 1998 and specializes in health, science and nutrition topics. Some of her articles have appeared in “Oxygen,” “American Fitness” and “Suite 101.” Coila has a B.S. in cell and molecular biology from the University of Cincinnati and 10 years of medical research experience.
Why Is an Apple Good for You?
Photo Credit several apples image by Maria Brzostowska from Fotolia.com

It’s a commonly accepted fact that apples are good for you. The saying “An apple a day keeps the doctor away” reflects how well-established the correlation is between apples and health. Many people may not know what is behind these health claims about apples, and how good for the body apples are. The health benefits of apples come not only from the nutrients they contain but also from compounds called phytochemicals. Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/277508-why-is-an-apple-good-for-you/#ixzz2D61CbG7t

 

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/277508-why-is-an-apple-good-for-you/#ixzz2D62dcvro

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